Blog - Orthopedic Surgeon For Hip, Knee Surgeries at Zehr Center In Naples Florida.

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Torn meniscus


A torn meniscus makes itself known in unusual ways. Has your knee “locked up”? Is your knee swollen and painful? Have you heard any “popping” or “clicking” when you bend your knee? If you have experienced any of these symptoms, then you could have a torn meniscus. The menisci (there are two of them) are tissues in the knee joint between the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia). They act as shock absorbers, providing protection for the articular cartilage that keeps your joints moving fluidly. Diagnosing a torn meniscus The menisci are prone to injury. Your surgeon will diagnose meniscal injuries with a thorough physical examination and history. X-rays will not reveal a torn meniscus; Read More...

Meniscus tears


Meniscus tears are common injuries among athletes and aging adults. In your knee joint, between your shinbone (tibia) and your thighbone (femur), are two structures that act as shock absorbers. They are known collectively as menisci. The C-shaped medial meniscus lies on the inside part of your knee.  The U-shaped lateral meniscus is found on the outer half. The two menisci form a gasket between the tibia and the femur. They help spread out the forces that are transmitted across the joint. The ends of your tibia and femur are covered with articular cartilage – a smooth, slippery material that allows the bone surfaces to slide against each other without causing damage to either surface. The menisci protect Read More...

The ligamentum teres


The ligamentum teres has a very important job. It helps hold the head of the femur (thigh bone) in the hip socket. If you pull a chicken leg out of its socket, you'll see a fibrous white ligament. That's the equivalent of the ligamentum teres in the human. Traumatic or twisting injuries can cause this ligament to tear. Hip dislocation can stretch it to the tearing point, too. Doctors don't have a test to help them find this type of tear in the ligamentum teres. It doesn’t show up in MRIs, X-rays or CT scans. The patient’s symptoms, such as deep groin pain and repetitive mechanical symptoms such as popping, catching, locking or “giving way” of the hip are the only signs that an injury to the Read More...

Hamstring injuries


Hamstring injuries sideline many an athlete. The hamstrings are the big group of muscles and tendons in the back of the thigh. Injuries in this powerful muscle group are common. Though these injuries can be very painful, they will usually heal on their own. However, for an injured hamstring to return to full function, it needs special attention and a specially designed rehabilitation program. When the hamstring is injured, the fibers of the muscles or tendon are actually torn. The body responds to the damage by producing enzymes and other body chemicals at the site of the injury. These chemicals produce the symptoms of swelling and pain. Hamstring injuries happen when the muscles are stretched too far, Read More...

Aching joints CAN predict weather


Aching joints can really put a dent in your activities, especially in cold weather. We don't often use "cold" and "Florida" in the same sentence, but temperatures do drop over the winter months. The factor that may be responsible for your aching joints is not snow, cold or rain, but actually, a change in barometric pressure. Barometric pressure is the force exerted onto a surface by the weight of the atmosphere at any given point. As cold weather moves in, the barometric pressure begins to drop. Cold weather does not affect everyone with arthritis, but if you experience aching joints as the mercury drops, try the remedies below. Layer your clothing. Layers trap body heat and help you avoid rapid Read More...

Partial knee replacement vs. total knee replacement


Partial knee replacement or total knee replacement? Which do you need? Not every patient suffering from knee osteoarthritis needs to have a total knee replacement. When only one side of the knee has worn down, you may be a candidate for partial knee replacement. Partial knee replacement is also known as unicompartmental knee replacement. Three major compartments make up your knee. The medial compartment is the inside part of the knee. The lateral compartment is the outside part.  The patellofemoral compartment is the front of the knee between the kneecap and thighbone. Advantages of partial knee replacement In a partial knee replacement, we replace only the damaged compartment with metal and plastic. We Read More...

Articular cartilage


Articular cartilage covers the ends of the bones in your knee joint. Articular cartilage has a smooth, slippery surface that allows the bones to slide over each other without rubbing. Lesions can appear in the surface, damaging the articular cartilage. A grade IV, or full-thickness, lesion is a tear that goes all the way through the cartilage. Grade IV lesions usually require surgical repair. You may have injured your articular cartilage and not even know it. This is because a lesion is not usually painful at first. There are no nerves in cartilage tissue, but any lesions can cause the knee joint to become inflamed and painful. If the lesion is large enough, the bone below the cartilage will be exposed. Read More...

Surgical treatment for knee osteoarthritis


Surgical treatment for knee osteoarthritis should be considered when other efforts to treat your pain fail to bring relief. Arthroscopy Using an arthroscope, your surgeon can check the condition of the articular cartilage. He can also clean the joint by removing loose fragments of cartilage. Some patients experience relief when the joint is simply flushed with saline solution. Your surgeon may use a burring tool to roughen badly worn spots on the cartilage. This procedure promotes growth of new cartilage called fibrocartilage, which is like scar tissue. The procedure is often helpful for temporary relief of symptoms for up to two years. Proximal Tibial Osteotomy Osteoarthritis usually affects the Read More...

Non-surgical treatment for knee osteoarthritis


Non-surgical treatment for knee osteoarthritis consists of several therapies. Osteoarthritis of the knee can't be cured, but these therapies may ease symptoms and slow down the degeneration. Non-surgical treatment for knee osteoarthritis through medication Your doctor may suggest acetaminophen (Tylenol) or a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen (Advil) or aspirin. Alternatively, he may prescribe one of the newer anti-inflammatory medicines called COX-2 inhibitors. They show promising results and do not cause as much stomach upset and other intestinal problems. Glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate may also help people with knee osteoarthritis. These supplements seem to have nearly Read More...

Understanding knee osteoarthritis


Knee osteoarthritis is sometimes referred to as wear and tear arthritis. Osteoarthritis of the knee joint is a common problem for many people. It affects the articular cartilage, which is the smooth lining that covers the ends of the leg bones where they meet to form the knee joint. Articular cartilage decreases friction in the knee joint. Beneath the cartilage is a layer of bone. When the articular cartilage wears away, the bone below is uncovered and rubs against bone. Small outgrowths may form in the joint. These are commonly called bone spurs. Knee osteoarthritis causes Years of repeated strain on the knee can cause knee osteoarthritis. Abnormal movement and alignment of the knee caused by ligament Read More...

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