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Avoiding complications from hip fracture surgery


There are risks associated with surgery of any kind, and surgery for a hip fracture is no different. Regardless of whether you have had a simple pinning procedure or a total hip replacement, you and your surgeon need to watch for complications. The more common complications actually result from being immobilized after surgery, not the surgery itself, so the sooner you are up and walking around, the better. Anesthesia Problems with anesthesia can be reactions to the drugs used, problems related to other medical complications, and problems due to the anesthesia. Some patients simply do not tolerate the process of anesthesia well. If you have concerns about the anesthesia that will be required for your surgery, Read More...

Understanding osteoarthritis


Arthritis includes more than 100 different rheumatic diseases and conditions, but the most common is osteoarthritis, affecting more than 75% of people over the age of 55. "Osteoarthritis is a huge public health problem that's going to grow considerably in the next 20 years," predicts rheumatologist Patience White, a spokesperson for the Arthritis Foundation. Almost 54 million Americans say they have been diagnosed with arthritis. By 2030, the number is expected to grow to 67 million. Obesity, lack of physical activity, injuries, and the aging population are all factors contributing to this unprecedented growth. Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterized by a breakdown of articular cartilage in the Read More...

Even loose-jointed yoga instructor has hip pain


I am a yoga instructor with a very painful hip. I can't figure it out because my joints are very loose. But every time I flex my hip past 90-degrees or try to cross my legs, I get a very sharp pain deep in my hip. What could be causing this? Hip pain with limitations on full hip motion in an active adult requires special attention — especially if you are in your 20s or 30s. Early diagnosis and treatment is imperative to avoid degenerative changes in the hip joint later in life. There are many possible causes of this type of hip pain. Given your description, one of the most likely would be femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) describes a condition where the top of the femur Read More...

Revision joint replacement


As people live longer and more people receive joint replacements at younger ages, it is expected that an increasing number of those implants will wear out and / or fail for some reason. In these cases a second operation will be necessary to replace or revise the failed first replacement and this procedure is referred to as revision joint replacement. The increasing demands placed on these implants by patients in terms of longevity and durability; and expectations of patients to maintain their active lifestyles even with a joint replacement has presented a considerable reconstructive challenge to the surgeon, most of whom will not even attempt these complex revision surgeries. Fortunately, despite the Read More...

Treatment for hip fracture


As soon as your doctor determines that your overall medical condition is stable; he will begin treatment for your hip fracture. The most common treatment for a hip fracture is surgery. If possible, the surgery is performed within 24 hours of your admission to the hospital. The goal of any surgical procedure to treat a fractured hip is to hold the broken bones securely in position, in order for them to heal properly. The type of surgery you have generally depends on the location of the fracture in the bone, the severity of the fracture and your age. Most hip fractures are treated in one of three ways: by repairing it with hardware, replacing part of the femur or replacing the entire hip joint. You surgeon may Read More...

How to diagnose a hip fracture


The hip is comprised of a large structure of bone that forms a ball-and-socket joint. The buttock and thigh muscles, along with some cartilage, support the hip. After a hip injury, your doctor has to determine whether or not your hip has been fractured. This may not be as simple as it sounds. A hip fracture is typically determined with x-rays. Occasionally, x-rays do not show the fracture and an MRI is necessary to make small fractures visible so your doctor can make the proper diagnosis. In an MRI, magnetic waves are used to take a series of pictures of the hip. It is very important to determine if the pain in your hip after an injury or fall is indeed a fractured hip or just pain from the injury or fall Read More...

What causes a hip fracture?


In order to explain what causes a hip fracture, it is necessary to have some understanding of the anatomy of the hip. The hip is a large structure of bone that forms a ball-and-socket joint. The buttock and thigh muscles as well as cartilage support the hip. One key element of the hip that is important to understand is how blood is supplied to it. Blood flows through the neck of the femur (thighbone). If for any reason, blood flow to the hip is stopped as a result of damage; there is no alternative blood supply to that area. If a hip should fracture and cause the blood to stop flowing to the hip, the bone will die. This is one of the complications of a hip fracture. Regarding hip fractures, the first thing Read More...
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