Hips Archives - Orthopedic Surgeon For Hip, Knee Surgeries at Zehr Center In Naples Florida.

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Coming home after total hip replacement surgery


Everyone looks forward to going home from the hospital!  With the direct anterior approach to total hip replacement performed by Dr. Robert Zehr, you can expect to be home in just 2-3 days. Here are a few things you can do to make your homecoming easier on yourself. Will I need help at home? Maybe.  Most patients that have done their pre-op physical therapy are able to function well at home without great assistance. Importantly, our program is designed for patients to have a family member (“Caddy”), who has been with them from the beginning, help them at home. For the first several days or weeks, depending on your progress, you will benefit from someone to assist you with meal preparation, Read More...

What to expect after total hip replacement surgery


With your preparations for total hip replacement surgery completed, you probably have some questions about what to expect.  Here are the most frequently asked questions about what will happen after your hip replacement surgery.  How long will I be incapacitated right after surgery? We expect you will get out of bed and walk the day of surgery. This is extremely important to get your muscles moving to help prevent blood clots from forming in your legs.  In addition, the next morning you will get up and will be walking with a walker to participate in physical therapy.  You will be allowed to shower the day after surgery. Most patients are able to walk ¼ mile around a track set up in the hospital prior Read More...

Preparation for total hip replacement surgery continues


Properly preparing for total hip replacement surgery includes doing some paperwork, considering some important medical issues and getting your home ready for your return after hip surgery. Here’s what you need to know to complete step two. Pre-register with the hospital In most hospitals you will need to pre-register in the admitting department of the hospital prior to your surgery day.  An appointment will be made for you.  Plan about one hour for this visit.  The admitting department is found in the front lobby of the hospital.  Usually there are hospital volunteers at the information desk to assist you in finding this area. At this visit you will be providing personal information to the hospital Read More...

Preparing for total hip replacement


We recently discussed some basic questions to ask before getting a total hip replacement. Educating yourself is an all-important step when considering hip replacement surgery. Are you ready to go ahead with your minimally invasive hip replacement surgery? Then let’s go to step two - preparing for surgery. Get in shape before the surgery Your surgeon knows that physically fit patients recover much faster and return to activity sooner than patients who are sedentary.  If you want your recovery to be shorter in time and have less pain then you need to get yourself in shape.  It is, in fact, your responsibility to make yourself as strong as you can. We will direct you to a physical therapist for Read More...

Preliminary questions about total hip replacement


If it seems that you are hearing about increasing numbers of younger people having hip replacement surgery, you are hearing correctly. Each year, over 400,000 people in the U.S. undergo total hip replacement surgery and of that group, half are under the age of 65 years old. Both movie stars and your “average Joe” are afflicted with the process we know as osteoarthritis. Typically, these younger patients are unwilling to accept the chronic pain and limitations of a deteriorating hip joint that severely diminishes their ability, to not only play sports but also even to perform normal daily activities. This often leads to a loss of independence and self-esteem not to mention, family bliss. A replacement Read More...

Recovering from hip surgery


Recovering from hip surgery, patients have many questions. One of the first questions that a hip replacement patient asks is “When can I….?” You can fill in the blank with any activity but they all entail bending your hip joint. If you have had a total hip replacement using the posterior approach, you need to avoid bending your hip more than 90 degrees. This severely limits your activities, such as gardening. For instance, you can kneel down, but should avoid kneeling directly on the side you were operated on. Try to keep your weight evenly placed. While kneeling in your garden, you need to avoid bending too forward at the hip. You cannot get onto your hands and knees because this position puts Read More...

Treating trochanteric bursitis


Treating trochanteric bursitis focuses on reducing the inflammation and pain. Trochanteric bursitis is an inflammation of the bursa at the point where a large tendon stretches across the bony bump on your hip known as the greater trochanter. It is the result of a buildup of friction, which can be caused by a repetitive use injury, an acute injury, a systemic condition like arthritis or an infection. Your orthopedic surgeon can usually diagnose the condition by reviewing your medical history and conducting a physical examination. If an injection of a local anesthetic into the bursa relieves the hip pain immediately, the diagnosis is usually trochanteric bursitis.  Occasionally, your doctor may order X-rays Read More...

Trochanteric bursitis


Trochanteric bursitis is an inflammation of the bursa on the side of the hip. Your body contains hundreds of thin, slippery sacs called bursa. These sacs contain a small amount of fluid. They are located where there is movement of a joint causing two tissues to rub against each other. Their purpose is to reduce friction in these areas to allow the joint to move freely. Causes of trochanteric bursitis Bursa can become inflamed, usually because of repetitive overuse injury or excessive pressure. An acute injury such as a bruise, systemic conditions such as arthritis, and infection of the bursa can cause them to become inflamed. When the normally slippery bursa becomes thickened and swollen, bursitis is the Read More...

Should you repair or replace a fractured hip?


Repair or replace a fractured hip? Left to itself, a fractured hip, like most broken bones, will mend itself. The healing process, however, requires immobilizing the joint through complete bed rest, which often takes three to four months. There is potential for other medical problems to develop, especially in the elderly. The complications of prolonged bed rest can include blood clots, bedsores, malnutrition, and pneumonia. Surgery to resolve the problem is therefore recommended. A hip fracture can impair the flow of blood to the structures in your hip joint. If an adequate blood supply is not restored quickly, bone and tissue can die. This complication of hip fractures is called avascular necrosis Read More...

Aching joints CAN predict weather


Aching joints can really put a dent in your activities, especially in cold weather. We don't often use "cold" and "Florida" in the same sentence, but temperatures do drop over the winter months. The factor that may be responsible for your aching joints is not snow, cold or rain, but actually, a change in barometric pressure. Barometric pressure is the force exerted onto a surface by the weight of the atmosphere at any given point. As cold weather moves in, the barometric pressure begins to drop. Cold weather does not affect everyone with arthritis, but if you experience aching joints as the mercury drops, try the remedies below. Layer your clothing. Layers trap body heat and help you avoid rapid Read More...
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