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Understanding knee osteoarthritis


Sometimes referred to as wear and tear arthritis, osteoarthritis of the knee joint is a common problem for many people. It affects the articular cartilage, which is the smooth lining that covers the ends of the leg bones where they meet to form the knee joint. Articular cartilage decreases friction in the knee joint. Beneath the cartilage is a layer of bone. When the articular cartilage wears away, the bone below is uncovered and rubs against bone. Small outgrowths may form in the joint. These are commonly called bone spurs. Years of repeated strain on the knee can cause knee osteoarthritis. Abnormal movement and alignment of the knee caused by ligament tears, meniscal injuries or fractures of the joint Read More...

Surgical treatment for ACL injuries


The main goal of surgery for an ACL injury is to keep the tibia from moving too far forward under the femur bone and to get the knee functioning normally again. To reduce scarring inside the joint and to speed your recovery, most surgeons will prescribe several sessions of physical therapy before the surgery. This will also reduce swelling and ensure you can straighten the knee completely. ACL injuries are not generally repaired using sutures to sew the original ligament back into place because primary repair of the ACL has  generally been shown to fail over time. Therefore, the torn ACL is replaced by a substitute graft made of a hamstring tendon or patellar tendon graft or even some artificial materials.  Read More...

Non-surgical treatment for ACL injuries


The focus of nonsurgical treatment for a torn ACL or other ACL injury is on decreasing the pain and swelling in your knee, beginning with rest and mild over-the-counter pain medications such as Tylenol. Your knee joint may need to be drained, in order to remove any blood in the joint. You will most likely be instructed to put a normal amount of weight on the injured leg while walking, and may need to use crutches until you can walk without a limp. The nonsurgical treatment of your ACL injury may continue with physical therapy. Therapists use ice, electrical stimulation, and rest periods with your leg supported in elevation to treat swelling and pain. To help you regain normal movement of your joints and Read More...

Understanding osteoarthritis


Arthritis includes more than 100 different rheumatic diseases and conditions, but the most common is osteoarthritis, affecting more than 75% of people over the age of 55. "Osteoarthritis is a huge public health problem that's going to grow considerably in the next 20 years," predicts rheumatologist Patience White, a spokesperson for the Arthritis Foundation. Almost 54 million Americans say they have been diagnosed with arthritis. By 2030, the number is expected to grow to 67 million. Obesity, lack of physical activity, injuries, and the aging population are all factors contributing to this unprecedented growth. Osteoarthritis is a chronic condition characterized by a breakdown of articular cartilage in the Read More...

Revision joint replacement


As people live longer and more people receive joint replacements at younger ages, it is expected that an increasing number of those implants will wear out and / or fail for some reason. In these cases a second operation will be necessary to replace or revise the failed first replacement and this procedure is referred to as revision joint replacement. The increasing demands placed on these implants by patients in terms of longevity and durability; and expectations of patients to maintain their active lifestyles even with a joint replacement has presented a considerable reconstructive challenge to the surgeon, most of whom will not even attempt these complex revision surgeries. Fortunately, despite the Read More...

How to identify ACL injuries


In order to properly identify an ACL injury, it is imperative that you have an understanding of the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) and its function as well as typical activities that tend to result in such injuries. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is a strong band of tissue that connects the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shinbone). The ACL attaches to the backside of the femur, and goes under the femur, ultimately attaching to the front of the tibia. The femur has a special notch hollowed out at its bottom where the ACL runs across. This special notch is known as the intercondylar notch, and it keeps the ACL in place as it stretches and recoils. The function of the ACL is to control how far forward Read More...

Injuries to the ACL


Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are one of the most common sports injuries to the knee. It happens to professionals and amateurs alike. An ACL injury affects the quality of life of all those who suffer such damage to the knee. It can restrict the success of the professional athlete and restrict the range of activities for amateur athletes as well as all others who are affected. The ACL is a ligament. Ligaments are tough bands of tissue whose function is to connect bones together. Specifically, the ACL's function is to connect the femur (thighbone) to the tibia (shinbone). It is a long ligament which connects the backside of the thighbone to the front portion of the shinbone and restricts how Read More...
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